Trauma-Informed Domestic Violence Services: Understanding the Framework and Approach (Part 1 of 3)

The first of a 3-part series that also includes Building Program Capacity (PART 2 of 3) and Developing Collaborations and Increasing Access (PART 3 of 3), PART 1 provides an overview of the framework and research supporting trauma-informed approaches to working with survivors and their children.

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Trauma-Informed Services and Approaches to Domestic Violence Intervention: Understanding the Framework and Approach (Part 1 of 3) by the National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma & Mental Health in partnership with the National Resource Center on Domestic Violence (April 2013)

The first of a 3-part series that also includes Building Program Capacity (PART 2 of 3) and Developing Collaborations and Increasing Access (PART 3 of 3), PART 1 provides an overview of the framework and research supporting trauma-informed approaches to working with survivors and their children.

Building on over 20 years of work in this area, the National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma & Mental Health (NCDVTMH) has put into practice a framework that integrates a trauma-informed approach with a DV victim advocacy lens. The term trauma-informed is used to describe organizations and practices that incorporate an understanding of the pervasiveness and impact of trauma and that are designed to reduce retraumatization, support healing and resiliency, and address the root causes of abuse and violence (NCDVTMH 2013 adapted from Harris and Fallot 2001). The resources compiled in these linked collections reflect this integrated perspective.

The goals of this Special Collection series are to provide:

  • Basic information about the different ways in which trauma can affect individuals and to highlight current research on effective ways to respond to trauma;
  • Practical guidance on developing trauma-informed DV programs and services; and
  • Resources that will help support collaboration between DV programs, and mental health, substance abuse, and other social services agencies and that will increase awareness about trauma treatment in the context of DV.