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VAWnet: Applied Research Papers

VAWnet’s Applied Research Project brings together domestic and sexual violence researchers and practitioners who support the production of high-quality, peer reviewed Applied Research papers designed to synthesize and interpret current research on violence against women, offering a review of the literature and implications for practice.

Each of the 10-12 page papers listed in the tabs below are designed to be used for a variety of purposes: training and education, influencing public policy, systems advocacy, staff and professional development, grant writing, and program development.

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Currently Viewing Results for "Sexual Violence":

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June 2009
This Applied Research paper provides a brief overview of research on the impact of sexual violence on females’ high-risk health behaviors and reproductive health, focusing on studies of sexual assault or rape experienced primarily during adulthood.
Authors: Sandra L. Martin and Rebecca J. Macy With contributions from Janice A. Mirabassi
September 2006
This paper consolidates knowledge about the damaging interplay between homelessness and sexual violence. It clarifies steps researchers, policy-makers, and service providers can take to intervene with victims and prevent future sexual assaults.
Authors: Lisa A. Goodman, Ph.D., Katya Fels, & Catherine Glenn, M.A. With contributions from Judy Benitez
March 2006
"This document describes current research findings on the effects of childhood and adulthood sexual victimization on women's mental health. Existing data on understudied communities and risk factors for mental health problems are discussed."
Authors: Nicole P. Yuan, Mary P. Koss, and Mirto Stone
December 2002
Violence perpetrated against women and girls increases their risk of arrest and incarceration; this paper examines the intersections of violence that are forcing abused girls and women into the criminal justice system not as victims, but as offenders.
Authors: Mary E. Gilfus