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Posts Tagged ‘ending violence’

Violence Against Women Act Listening Tour Stops in Northeast Louisiana from Nexstar Broadcasting, 03/30/2015

March 31st, 2015 Justine No comments

Its been 20 years since the Violence Against Women Act was signed into law.

To honor that anniversary, officials from the Department of Justice are visiting outreach programs across the nation. Monday, they made several stops in Ouachita and Morehouse parish.

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Joe Biden: Domestic Violence Is A ‘Public Health Epidemic’ from the Huffington Post, 02/20/2015

March 24th, 2015 Justine No comments

“All of you in this room who are doctors, nurses, researchers, social workers from all across the country, the fact that we are talking today about domestic violence as a public health epidemic is because of you,” he said. “We have come such a long way in our fight against this epidemic, but we have to keep making the case even stronger for prevention and intervention.”

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that nearly one-third of U.S. women will experience domestic violence in their lifetime. Domestic violence is associated with an array of health problems. In the short-term, physical violence can result in serious injuries or even death. At least one-third of all female homicide victims in the U.S. are killed by male intimate partners. But studies have found that domestic violence has long-term health consequences as well.

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Comprehensive legislation will help Alabama fight plague of domestic violence: guest opinion from All Alabama, 03/23/2015

March 23rd, 2015 Justine No comments

In our nation, a woman is beaten every nine seconds. One in four women will experience severe physical abuse in their lifetime. Annually 10 million children witness their mothers being beaten inside their own homes. Approximately three women are murdered every day by those who promised to love them.

Domestic violence does not discriminate, and it is prevalent in every demographic, race, sex, economic status, and every state–including our sweet home Alabama.

As a wife, mother, grandmother, and Alabama’s First Lady, how can I see these statistics and not effect change?

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Help Teens Navigate Dangers of Domestic Violence from Philly.com, 03/23/2015

March 23rd, 2015 Justine No comments

Teen dating violence is a pattern of controlling and abusive behavior used by one partner to gain power over the other. Such behavior includes physical, sexual, emotional, and/or psychological abuse. Tragically, research shows that too many of our young adults are in such relationships.

A 2014 study by the National Research Opinion Center at the University of Chicago has found that 20 percent of teens, both boys and girls, report being the victim of physical and sexual dating abuse. Meanwhile, Loveisnotabuse.org reports that nearly one in three college students say they have been abused by a partner. These statistics transcend demographic categories, including race, socioeconomic status, and geographical location. Domestic violence doesn’t discriminate.

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Campaign encouraging men to speak out against domestic violence from WSYR-TV, 03/16/2015

March 17th, 2015 Justine No comments

Syracuse (WSYR-TV) – In Onondaga County police respond to more than 1,000 calls for domestic violence every month.

On Monday the effort to fight domestic violence in Central New York kicked off with a breakfast for Vera House’s White Ribbon Campaign, followed by an annual walk Friday.

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At Last, Violence Against Women Act Lets Tribes Prosecute Non-Native Domestic Abusers from Huffington Post, 03/06/2015

March 12th, 2015 Justine No comments

Two years after Congress reauthorized the Violence Against Women Act, Native American tribes can finally take advantage of one of the law’s most significant updates: a provision that allows tribal courts to investigate and prosecute non-Native men who abuse Native women on reservations.

Starting Saturday, tribes can claim jurisdiction over non-Native men who commit crimes of domestic violence, dating violence or who violate a protection order against a victim who lives on tribal land. Until now, that jurisdiction has fallen to federal or state law enforcement, who are often hours away from reservations and lack the resources to respond. The result has effectively allowed non-Native abusers immunity from punishment.

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